Reading at Whitehouse

Reading Recovery At Whitehouse Primary School

Reading Recovery is a programme of daily individual lessons for children who are not finding it easy to read or write. The specialist Reading Recovery teacher provides a series of intensive lessons for 12-20 weeks.

During that time you will see children’s reading and writing improve rapidly and their confidence will increase, affecting their work in the classroom.

Ms Liz Whitmore is our Reading Recovery Teacher at Whitehouse Primary.

‘Having a Reading Recovery teacher on the staff team has enabled us to lift literacy levels across school as she supports teachers, teaching assistants and parents in addressing needs of children who otherwise may find learning to read and write challenging. Daily lessons with individual children accelerates their learning by approximately four times the classroom rate. Children experience improved self-esteem and confidence across the curriculum.’

R Woods. Headteacher.


‘Reading Recovery allows almost all children to succeed and has the positive potential to permanently close the attainment gap.’

K Lewis. Literacy Lead.


‘I cant thank you enough for all your help with Mya. The progress she has made is AMAZING! Thankyou so much. ‘

(Mya’s mum)


‘I cant believe how much she can now read and in such a short space of time. I’m so very pleased and proud of the progress she has made.’

(Melissa’s mum)


‘She is much more confident and puts lots of expression into her reading now.’

( Mia’s mum)


‘She now reads so well and is starting to notice when she is making mistakes now and corrects herself.’

(Grace’s mum.)

Please follow this link to find out more: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/reading-recovery-europe/reading-recovery


‘I would also draw your attention to the video we made with your co-operation last year which featured at the conference this year (see the section called England). We got 9 of the 16 minute slot of which I am very proud! Over 450 people attended the conference across Europe. Here’s the video link in case you haven’t seen it https://youtu.be/yXdxgS07YWM

Kerry Clegg (Teacher Leader for Reading Recovery North East)

At Whitehouse Primary School we have a systematic approach to the teaching of reading and use the Read Write Inc scheme. From reception onwards, children are taught to recognise and write letters and make links between letters (graphemes) and sounds (phonemes) in order to read words.

Common words that cannot be sounded out are taught alongside the programme, in order to ensure children know these words by sight. These are referred to as red words. Children are assessed every half-term and placed in small groups at the appropriate level, to ensure that they make the maximum amount of progress.

All pupils in KS1 and KS2 read on a daily basis in a range of contexts; daily guided reading sessions, one-to-one reading sessions, Reading Pro sessions and the sharing of a class novel. We have a well-resourced library and children take quizzes on the books they read to check their understanding. Pupils are encouraged to take reading and library books home every evening and we ask families to listen to the child read at least three times a week.

For more information on the Read Write Inc (RWInc) programme, please visit the link below.

Class Reader Ethos

Story time at Whitehouse takes place daily and lasts for 15 minutes or more – this is particularly important as Reading to children is a statutory requirement of the National Curriculum.

Each class has a class story book that has been specifically chosen to engage and excite the children. This may, in some cases, be the one chosen for the book curriculum for their English lessons.

Some benefits of reading to children:

  • improved imagination
  • increased vocabulary
  • greater listening skills
  • enjoyment of books
  • experience of other places, times and cultures
  • moral issues
  • improved writing
  • internalising narrative patterns
  • hearing good models of spoken English

Reading Mornings

Every week each year group holds x2 reading mornings where parents and children come into school and read with their child at 8.45am in a calm and quiet environment. Staff are also on hand to answer any questions and support parents if needed.

Reading for Pleasure (RfP)

At Whitehouse we strive to develop a rich Reading for Pleasure atmosphere. We have worked hard to develop an ethos and an environment that excites, enthuses, inspires and values.

We aim to achieve a rich RfP atmosphere by providing:

  • High quality texts with depth and interest in story, character, illustration, vocabulary, structure and subject matter
  • A read aloud programme
  • Teachers who are knowledgeable about children’s literature
  • Creating a community of readers with opportunities to share responses and opinions
  • Planning for talking about books and stories, providing structures within which to do this
  • Understanding the importance of illustration in reading both in terms of creating a text and responding to a text
  • Using drama and role-play to help children to understand and access texts
  • Working with authors and author/illustrators to understand the process of creating books
  • Using literature beyond the literacy lesson – cross-curricular planning with quality literature as the starting point

In EY and KS1 children take home a RfP suitcase on a weekly basis. Parents and children are encouraged to snuggle up and share a story together along with a hot chocolate and some cookies. Many parents share these experiences via photographs on Seesaw.

Reading for Pleasure (RfP)

At Whitehouse we strive to develop a rich Reading for Pleasure atmosphere. We have worked hard to develop an ethos and an environment that excites, enthuses, inspires and values.

We aim to achieve a rich RfP atmosphere by providing:

  • High quality texts with depth and interest in story, character, illustration, vocabulary, structure and subject matter
  • A read aloud programme
  • Teachers who are knowledgeable about children’s literature
  • Creating a community of readers with opportunities to share responses and opinions
  • Planning for talking about books and stories, providing structures within which to do this
  • Understanding the importance of illustration in reading both in terms of creating a text and responding to a text
  • Using drama and role-play to help children to understand and access texts
  • Working with authors and author/illustrators to understand the process of creating books
  • Using literature beyond the literacy lesson – cross-curricular planning with quality literature as the starting point

In EY and KS1 children take home a RfP suitcase on a weekly basis. Parents and children are encouraged to snuggle up and share a story together along with a hot chocolate and some cookies. Many parents share these experiences via photographs on Seesaw.

Writing

The development of writing skills is a key priority for the school. All classes follow Pie Corbett’s ‘Talk4Write’ ethos as the primary approach to writing.  Literacy and Language covers a variety of reading and writing skills using exciting and engaging texts as a starting point. Within these lessons pupils are taught to recognise the features of different texts and practise the relevant skills. We assess writing at the end of each unit of work, through Hot Task writing and children are given the opportunity to evaluate their own progress and identify areas for development.   

Writing skills are further developed through cross-curricular writing across the curriculum. Children are expected to transfer skills learnt in English to other subject areas.

We take pride in the presentation of our work at Whitehouse and children are taught to develop their handwriting skills through the use ‘Penpals’, a handwriting scheme, to ensure there is a consistent approach throughout the school. For more information on the Talk4Write programme please visit the link below.

Phonics

Autumn

  • m a s d t i n p g o c k u b f e l h sh r j v y w th z ch qu x ng nk ck kn
  • Blending and segmenting VC/CVC words (word time 1-3)
  • Teach the gaps in set 1 sounds
  • Blending and segmenting CVC words with digraphs/special friends (word time 1-4)
  • Teach the gaps in set 1 sounds above
  • Blending and segmenting CVC words with digraphs/special friends (word time 1-5)
  • Set 1 revision with a focus on digraphs/special friends (word time 1-5)

Spring

  • Review Set 1 sounds
  • Revise blending and segmenting CVC words with digraphs/special friends (word time 1-5)
  • Introduce consonant clusters CCVC e.g. bl br fl (word time 6-7)
  • Introduction of pseudo/alien words

Summer

  • Review Set 1 sounds
  • Teach Set 2 sounds ay ee igh ow(snow) oo(zoo) oo(look) ar or air ir ou oy
  • Review consonant clusters CCVC e.g. bl br fl (word time 6-7)

Autumn

  • Review Set 1 sounds
  • Consolidate Set 2 sounds ay ee igh ow(snow) oo(zoo) oo(look) ar or air ir ou oy
  • Review consonant clusters CCVC e.g. bl br fl (word time 6-7)
  • Review Set 1 sounds
  • Consolidate Set 2 sounds
  • Review Set 1 sounds
  • Review Set 2 sounds
  • Teach Set 3 sounds for reading only ea oi a-e i-e o-e u-e aw are ur er ow(cow) ai oa ew ire ear ure e-e au ue

Spring

  • Review Set 1 sounds
  • Review Set 2 sounds
  • Teach Set 3 sounds for reading only ea oi a-e i-e o-e u-e aw are ur er ow(cow) ai oa ew ire ear ure e-e au ue

Summer

  • Review Set 2 sounds
  • Review Set 3 sounds ea oi a-e i-e o-e u-e aw are ur er ow(cow) ai oa ew ire ear ure e-e au ue
  • Use letter names for spelling

Autumn

  • Review Set 2 sounds
  • Review Set 3 sounds ea oi a-e i-e o-e u-e aw are ur er ow(cow) ai oa ew ire ear ure e-e au ue
  • Use letter names for spelling

Speaking and Listening

The development of speaking and listening skills is essential to learning across the curriculum. Consequently, opportunities for paired and group discussions, focused speaking activities and drama-based tasks are built into most lessons.

Grammar

Grammar is now assessed at the end of each Key Stage with a formal SATs paper and is an important part of English at Whitehouse. It is taught daily and children have the opportunity to practise their skills through both written and oral activities.